Sustainable development in Germany - 17 Goals to Transform our World

Health and nutrition – Living healthy longer

Indicator 3.1.a, b: Premature mortality

a) Women Weathersymbol

(Evaluation of the development of Germany in the reporting year 2018 as reporting year from indicator report 2021)

b) Men Weathersymbol

(Evaluation of the development of Germany in the reporting year 2018 as reporting year from indicator report 2021)

Selection

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This overview includes additional information on the indicators presented above, such as a brief definition of the indicator and a description of the politically determined target value, as well as the political intention for selecting the indicator.

Definition of indicators (Taken from the official translation of the German Sustainable Development Strategy)

The indicator comprises the number of fatalities among females (3.1.a) and males (3.1.b) in the population below 70 years of age per 100,000 of the old European standard population aged under 70 (excluding those less than one year old).

Target and intention of the German Government (Taken from the official translation of the German Sustainable Development Strategy)

By 2030, premature mortality among women should not exceed 100, and for men it should not exceed 190 fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants.

Data state

The data published in the indicator report 2021 is as of 31.12.2020. The data shown on the DNS-Online-Platform is updated regularly, so that more current data may be available online than published in the indicator report 2021.

Last modification of code (data) 2021-06-30: see changes on GitHub opens in a new window
Last modification of code (text) 2021-09-10: see changes on GitHub opens in a new window

Taken from the official translation of the German Sustainable Development Strategy

The data sources are the cause of death statistics and the population statistics of the Federal Statistical Office. For the cause of death statistics, all official death certificates are recorded and evaluated. The population statistics shows the current population data based on the results of the most recent census. The data relate to the old European standard population. A standard population is a modelled population that makes it possible to compare change rates over time. The cohort under one year of age, and hence infant mortality, is disregarded. The indicator is also part of the health reporting conducted by the Federal Government.

Premature mortality decreased steadily between 1991 and 2018 for both women (-36%) and men (-43%). The larger decline among men has also reduced the gender-specific difference in premature mortality. In 2018, for example, 151 women and 279 men per 100,000 inhabitants died before the age of 70. If the trend of past years remains unchanged, however, the gender-specific targets for 2030 will be missed.

Reflecting the steady decrease in premature mortality, life expectancy in Germany has continued to follow an upward curve. Todays 70-year-old women can, statistically, expect to live another 17.0 years and 60-year-old men another 14.3.

In the period from 2016 to 2018, the average life expectancy for newborn girls was 83.3 years and for boys 78.5 years, which was 4.3 years more for girls and 6.0 years more for boys girls than in the years 1991 to 1993. Differences in life expectancy between the old Länder and the new Länder (each excluding Berlin) are to be seen only among newborn boys. This difference amounts to 1.4 years.

The main cause of premature mortality in 2018 was malignant tumours, accounting for 37.0% of premature deaths, followed by cardiovascular diseases at 20.1%. At 8.9%, fatalities due to external causes, such as accidents, poisoning and suicide, were also a significant factor. Diseases of the digestive and respiratory systems contributed with figures of 7.0% and 5.9% respectively. Since 1991, the share of malignant tumours and diseases of the respiratory system among all causes of death have increased by 11.2% and 47.1% respectively. In contrast, there have been decreases in the shares of cardiovascular diseases (-35.4%), external causes (-19.0%) and diseases of the digestive system (-8.3%).

Besides factors such as health related behaviour (see, for instance, indicators 3.1.c and 3.1.d on adolescent and adult smoking rates or 3.1.e and 3.1.f on child/adolescent and adult obesity rates), medical care also has a important influence on mortality rates. Health expenditure rose to EUR 391 billion in 2018. This was EUR 15 billion or 4.0% higher than in 2017. This expenditure corresponds to 11.7% of Germany’s gross domestic product. It is equivalent to an annual amount of EUR 4,712 per head of population, compared with EUR 4,545 in 2017.

This summary table illustrates the evaluations of the indicator by status of previous years. This shows whether the weather symbol for an indicator has been stable or rather volatile in the past years. (Evaluations from the indicator report 2021)

Time series 1

Indicator

3.1.a Premature mortality (women)

Target

To be reduced to 100 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants (women) by 2030

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

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Time series 2

Indicator

3.1.b Premature mortality (men)

Target

To be reduced to 190 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants (men) by 2030

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

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 Federal Statistical Office

Organisation

Federal Statistical Office

Data source Causes of Death opens in a new window